Supreme Court says police generally need warrant to track cellphone locations

WASHINGTON — In a victory for privacy in the digital era, the Supreme Court ruled Friday that the Constitution protects tracking data from a cellphone, requiring police to have a search warrant to obtain cell tower records that show a person’s movement for days or weeks.

The justices, in a 5-4 decision, said the Fourth Amendment protects the data from being searched without a warrant, even though these records are collected and held by a private company, not the government. Read More. 

 

 

 

 

Breath-test issue prompts questions about DUIs in Lincoln, elsewhere in Nebraska

Apr 24, 2018

A certification issue with the breath tests used on suspected drunk drivers across Nebraska has led several counties, including Lancaster, to pursue blood samples in all DUI cases.

The issue — which applies to breath tests given in jail and at detox, not the preliminary tests used by officers on the street — has temporarily complicated Lincoln-area drunk-driving investigations and made them more invasive.

Meanwhile, defense attorneys across the state have been digging into how the certification issue might affect their clients and examining ways to challenge previous breath-test samples.

Jurors put emotions aside, find man guilty of assisting in girlfriend’s suicide

By Paul Hammel / World-Herald staff writer

In the end, it was about the law, not “agape” love or whether a Weeping Water man was justified in assisting the suicide of a girlfriend who insisted, falsely it turns out, that she was about to die from cancer.

On Friday, after hearing more than two days of testimony , a jury took less than three hours to find Matthew Stubbendieck guilty of assisting in the suicide of his girlfriend last summer.

Stubbendieck, 42, betrayed no emotion as the verdict was read or when he exited the courtroom.

He now faces up to two years in prison

 

 

 

 

Project Harmony, Omaha’s nationally known child-abuse agency, keeps upping its game

Omaha’s nationally recognized Project Harmony is expanding its efforts against child abuse and welcoming a stronger police presence.

For the first time, the Omaha Police Department has assigned a captain to work at the agency. She will oversee a staff, already there, of 32 full-time sworn officers and several others.

“We’re thrilled,” said Gene Klein, executive director of the nonprofit Project Harmony. “This is significant news for us, and we think it says so much about the Police Department’s commitment to protecting children.”

 

Meet the new Lancaster County Attorney: Pat Condon

Meet the new Lancaster County Attorney: Pat Condon

Lori Pilger, Lincoln Journal Star, 

    Pat Condon is far from the new guy at Lincoln’s Hall of Justice, where he’s been a deputy Lancaster County attorney since 1990. Thursday, he quietly was sworn in as the county’s new top prosecutor, filling the spot left when the U.S. Senate confirmed Joe Kelly as U.S. Attorney for Nebraska.

 

 

 

Assault protections expanded for health care providers, advanced

Assault protections expanded for health care providers, advanced

Lawmakers gave first-round approval Feb. 28 to a bill that would establish enhanced assault penalties for health care providers.

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Prohibition against threatening texts, emails advanced

Prohibition against threatening texts, emails advanced

Sending a text message with the intent to threaten someone would be a criminal offense under a bill that received first-round approval in the Legislature Feb. 28.

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Major prison reform package advances

Major prison reform package advances

JoANNE YOUNG Lincoln Journal Star Updated 5 hrs ago

The Judiciary Committee on Tuesday sent a package of bills to the full Legislature that are aimed at providing relief from prison crowding and reentry into communities for inmates.

The main bill (LB841), introduced by Lincoln Sen. Patty Pansing Brooks, would require the Department of Correctional Services to work with the Parole Board on policies and procedures to manage an overcrowding emergency, if one is declared or determined to exist. Read More.

 

 

 

 

County attorney applicants sought after Joe Kelly resigns

County attorney applicants sought after Joe Kelly resigns

Former Lancaster County Attorney Joe Kelly, who has been appointed U.S. Attorney for Nebraska, officially resigned his county position Friday.

His chief deputy, Pat Condon, became acting county attorney, and the Lancaster County Board began its traditional practice of soliciting applications for a longer-term replacement. Read More.